Why You Should Take Spam Email Seriously

There can hardly be a person who has used a computer in the last ten years who hasn’t received a spam email at some point or another. For most of us, this is a daily occurrence, a nuisance that can be filed alongside the daily commute and packaging that won’t open properly. It rarely occurs to many of us why we receive so much spam. While it is pretty obvious that there is a basic commercial imperative behind a lot of spam, why is this particular marketing technique so prevalent in the modern world?

Quite simply…because it works! Pitching goods via spam earns the people engaged in it hundreds of millions of dollars per business per year, while the cost and time involved in sending spam is somewhere between negligible and non-existent.

More



How to Spot a New Type of Spear Phishing Attack

In the every changing world of online threats, a new type of spear phishing attack has emerged.

Have you ever gotten an email in your office asking you to receive money on behalf of someone in distress? These emails are easy to spot as pure SPAM and/or Phishing attempts. Even if you didn’t recognize this as SPAM, you would remember what your mother told you as a kid: “If it seems too good to be true, then it probably is.” Take a look:

More



Microsoft Releases Internet Explorer “Zero Day” Vulnerability Security Update

Microsoft has released an out-of-band security update to address the latest Internet Explorer “Zero-Day” vulnerability, as of 1PM on Thursday, May 1st, 2014. The patch has been fully tested and is ready to be released for all affected browsers. Despite previous reports, Microsoft will be releasing the security update for Microsoft XP users.

How do I download the patch for the “Zero Day” Vulnerability?

As a reminder to all Thrive Managed Patching, ThriveCloud, and ThriveProtect customers, this patch will automatically be applied to your machine once we have tested it and approved it for release. You should continue to use other web-browsers until notified that you have been patched.

If you are a Thrive Managed Firewall customer, you have been protected from this vulnerability as long as you are behind your company’s corporate firewall.

For more information about Thrive’s Managed Patching and Managed Firewall Services, please visit our website.

This is a follow up to Thrive previous blog: “What you need to know about the Microsoft Internet Explorer “Zero-Day” Vulnerability

More



What you need to know about the Microsoft Internet Explorer “Zero-Day” Vulnerability

The latest Internet Explorer “Zero-Day” vulnerability, first acknowledged by Microsoft on Saturday, April 26th, has left all version of Internet Explorer 6 through 11 vulnerable to exploitation. However, initial reports indicate that IE versions 9, 10, and 11 are the primary targets. According to the research firm FireEye, the exploit uses an Adobe Flash SWF file to execute the exploit. Machines that do not have Flash installed are believed to be safe. It is important to note that Microsoft will not be producing a patch for its Microsoft XP operating system. Support for this OS ended on April 8, 2014 so if you’re running this operating system on your machine, you will need to upgrade.

If you currently have a Thrive Managed Firewall powered by Dell SonicWALL, the Intrusion Prevention signatures to cover the “Zero-Day” exploit were added to your device within the last 48 hours. You are protected from this vulnerability when on the Internet behind your corporate firewall.

More



What You Need to Know About the Heartbleed Bug OpenSSL Security Vulnerability

OpenSSL Heartbleed BugBy now you may have heard about the “Heartbleed Bug”, a serious security vulnerability in the OpenSSL cryptographic library. The OpenSSL library is used by a number of different computing platforms to secure communication between a client (typically in a web browser session) and a secure endpoint, typically a web site or device used to allow access to secure business systems. Anytime you are conducting a transaction online you are typically using SSL, and you can tell that you are doing so when the URL starts with “https://” or when you see a padlock appear in the browsing session. It is estimated that this vulnerability effects upwards of 50% of Internet web sites that use SSL, so the scope of the bug is potentially huge.

Because the vulnerability exposes extremely sensitive information to an entity who tries to exploit it, such as usernames, passwords, banking information, credit card information, and more, the threat is a very real and very serious one. You should take all reasonable precautions to secure your environment if you have systems that contain the vulnerability, as well as being aware of any communications from online vendors, such as banks, that may reach out to you indicating that they may have been subject to the vulnerability and that data may have been compromised.

For more technical information about the vulnerability you can start by looking here.

Thrive suggests that you do the following in response to the Heartbleed vulnerability:

  1. Analyze and secure your business systems that have the vulnerability present by shutting down and / or patching effected systems.
  2. Reach out to your third party vendors or providers about systems that utilize the Open SSL cryptographic library to ensure that the vulnerability is not present in those systems.

If you have any questions or would like Thrive to conduct a security audit of IT systems that are not managed by Thrive directly, please contact Thrive Networks today.

More



How Managed Firewalls Can Help Your Business Fill Compliance Gaps

Firewall management is a necessary but tedious and time consuming effort. It also requires industry-specific expertise in order to avoid costly security breaches which can jeopardize compliance requirements.

Meeting compliance requirements for your specific industry can occupy a significant amount of your IT professional’s time. Additionally, it can be difficult to find an IT expert with the appropriate industry experience to ensure all of your compliance requirements are met and your network is protected against unauthorized access.

When you choose to manage firewalls in-house, this requires a resource intensive effort since it involves device deployment and configuration, constant upgrades and security patching, in addition to monitoring upgrades to ensure the appropriate controls are installed to meet necessary changes in business processes. Then the network traffic must be continually monitored for threats so these can be acted upon in a timely manner to avoid costly breaches.

More



5 Common Patch Management Problems and How a Managed Patching Provider Can Help

Regardless of your industry, staying proactive with patch management can be a time consuming but extremely important effort. This is where a managed patching provider can be an invaluable resource.

If you were to conduct a survey of businesses to discover whether or not they are happy with their patch management strategy, the majority of them would likely say that they struggle with patch management processes and are overall dissatisfied with their patch management system. If you are one of the businesses that is constantly burdened by patch management, here are a few of the most common issues companies face and how a managed patching provider can help.

More



Ransomware – The Evolving Face of Spyware

Traditionally spyware and viruses have been mostly a nuisance as it relates to your PC or laptop. You might notice that your system is sluggish, and you might have to clean up or even rebuild your operating system, or worst case, pay someone to perform a cleanup and spyware removal for you if you don’t know how to do it yourself. Recently however a new and far more malicious form of spyware has started appearing on unprotected PCs, and its payload is far more dangerous and the cost of recovering from it is far higher than ever before. Its name, Ransomware, says it all – it is spyware that takes over your data or your system itself and holds it hostage from you unless you hand over your hard earned money to the criminal who has infected your PC in exchange for your data or access to your computer back.

With threats like this in the wild, it is prudent to be aware of how you could become infected, what you can do to protect your data and your PCs, and what you should do if you suspect your computer has been compromised.

More



Key Components When Conducting a Business Impact Analysis

When it comes to keeping your business up and running, it is all about the time factor. Time determines how fast you can recover business operations in the event of an outage or natural disaster. If you have already completed a risk assessment, the business impact analysis ensures that you do not incur additional expenses which can result from slow recovery time.

Although you may have already completed a risk assessment and you know what critical business operations must be recovered, this will not matter unless you can recover them within a reasonable amount of time. By conducting a business impact analysis this will ensure efficient business continuity in the event of a catastrophe.

So what are some of the key components you should consider when conducting a business impact analysis?

More



Notice of Java Security Vulnerability in Web Browsers

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) last week released an alert indicating that all versions of Java up to and including the then latest Java version 7 update 10, contained weaknesses that could allow a malicious attacker to run code on a machine that had Java installed and enabled in web browsers on that system. What made this notification unique is that the DHS was encouraging users to disable or uninstall Java altogether whereas in past security bulletins they generally gave feedback on how to steer clear of threats to US computer systems.

More



Page 1 of 612345...Last »